Crystalline Waterproofing

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Use this 3 part SimpleSpec™ specification template to specify fluid-applied crystalline waterproofing for concrete surfaces.

Concrete surfaces are often exposed to a wide range of environmental factors that can lead to water damage and structural degradation. To protect concrete surfaces from water damage, various waterproofing solutions are available on the market. Among them, fluid-applied crystalline waterproofing is a popular solution for concrete surfaces due to its effectiveness and durability.

What is it?

Fluid-applied crystalline waterproofing is a waterproofing solution that is applied as a coating to concrete surfaces. The coating is typically a mixture of Portland cement, quartz sand, and other chemical additives that react with water to form crystals that penetrate the concrete surface. These crystals grow within the concrete and fill the voids, cracks, and pores, effectively sealing the concrete and creating a waterproof barrier.

One of the key benefits of fluid-applied crystalline waterproofing is its ability to self-heal. If the concrete is damaged, the crystals will continue to grow and fill any voids, cracks, or pores, effectively repairing the waterproofing barrier.

Another benefit of fluid-applied crystalline waterproofing is its durability. Once the coating has cured, it is resistant to physical damage, UV radiation, and other environmental factors that can cause degradation.

Bentonite Waterproofing

Used in below-grade applications, such as basements and tunnels. Bentonite is a type of clay that swells when it comes into contact with water. When used as a waterproofing solution, bentonite is applied as a membrane to the exterior of the structure.

The membrane contains a layer of bentonite that is sandwiched between two layers of geotextile fabric. When the bentonite comes into contact with water, it swells and forms a barrier that prevents water from penetrating the structure.

One of the main differences between fluid-applied crystalline waterproofing and bentonite waterproofing is their application. Fluid-applied crystalline waterproofing is applied as a coating to the surface of the concrete, while bentonite waterproofing is applied as a membrane to the exterior of the structure.

Another difference between the two waterproofing solutions is their effectiveness in different applications. While fluid-applied crystalline waterproofing is effective in above-grade and below-grade applications, bentonite waterproofing is primarily used in below-grade applications.

Notes: 

Fluid-applied crystalline waterproofing is a popular solution for concrete surfaces due to its effectiveness, durability, and self-healing properties. While bentonite waterproofing is also a popular solution, it is primarily used in below-grade applications and applied as a membrane to the exterior of the structure.

Choosing the right waterproofing solution depends on a variety of factors.  Including the type of structure, the location, and the environmental factors. Consulting with a professional is recommended to determine the best waterproofing solution for a particular project.

It works well for walls where the exterior side cannot be accessed, such as on property line walls in existing construction. It does not waterproof holes and cracks that appear after the waterproofing is applied, so reapplication may be required.

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